New Canadian Media
Tuesday, 01 November 2016 10:26

Bramptonians Sucking on a Lollipop

Commentary by Surjit Singh Flora in Brampton

A few weeks before Brampton Council begin debate on the latest budget, the city and province delivered a big lollipop to the citizens of Brampton in the form of a University to be built in our city.

At the risk of sounding cynical, I can’t help but suspect this little bit of theatre is meant to divert the attention of Bramptonians away from the poor economic performance of our city, the recent tax increases, stagnant municipal services, and the provinces’ ruinously expensive and incompetently handled hydro mismanagement.

Now, don’t get me wrong, I, like many, believe a university campus is something Brampton needs, and needs badly. In fact, I know many parents are excited at the thought of their children obtaining a quality post-secondary education in their own city.

Downloading to taxpayers

But for anyone who listened to what was said at the Brampton press event, while Brampton has been chosen as the site of one of two new university campuses, there was no specific timeline or details about where or when this facility will be built, how it will be funded, or how much of the cost the province will download onto the backs of Brampton taxpayers in order to make the announcement a reality.  

What we do know is that there is a $90 million allotment for each of the two municipalities approved in this round of funding. Let’s remember that when then Premier Dalton McGuinty wrote his infamous letter to the Brampton citizens promising that Peel Memorial Hospital would not be closed – just before he closed it − the replacement facility’s phase I costs were over $300 million and Bramptonians were practically extorted into paying $60 million towards the project.  

If you think this is an isolated occurrence, think again.  When the province promised to finish highway 410 north to highway 10, it was only accomplished after the Region of Peel was forced to pony up over $40 million to the province.  

Citizens in the dark

Will $90 million build a university campus?  I highly doubt it.  I am convinced we are going to be put in the position of shelling out millions more from municipal coffers – your tax money – to provide land and capital funding in order to make this happen. How sweet does that lollipop taste now?

Let’s face it, we have no idea what we are getting out of this latest deal.  We know from the past the province promised to keep our original hospital open, then closed it, then tore it down.  The slogan for the new Peel Memorial was “More than a Hospital,” but in fact this too was a lie.  The new Peel Memorial will be much less than a hospital.  It will house outpatient services, clinics, dialysis, and will not have an emergency department.  Instead, it will have an urgent care centre that closes down at night, and while some services now housed at Brampton Civic are moving to the new building, Brampton is getting much less than it deserves in terms of health care services.  This does not bode well for our university.

Brampton Councillor Gurpreet Dhillon says this council worked hard work to make this university happen and Mayor Linda Jeffery maintains this is exciting news for Bramptonians. This from a council that turned down $300 million in funding for a light rail line up Main Street that over 70 per cent of the citizens wanted.  

I think the citizens of Brampton have some fundamental issues with trusting this council and these concerns are well justified.   

So, I think we can all look forward to a future that will see more tax levies for health care, our university, and whatever other lollipop the city or province thinks up to throw at Brampton, in an attempt to win our votes with our own money. That makes us all a bunch of suckers.  

Brampton-based Surjit Singh Flora is a veteran journalist and freelance writer. 

Published in Education

 INVESTIGATORS from Peel Regional Police are once again reminding the public of the ongoing calls citizens are receiving with regards to the Canada Revenue Agency and immigration scams. Police are urging citizens to be extra vigilant of suspicious phone calls. Police continue to receive reports from residents who have received phone calls from persons posing as government […]

 

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Published in National

PEEL Regional Police Detective Sergeant Baljiwan (BJ) Sandhu has alleged in a discrimination case before Ontario’s Human Rights Tribunal that he was denied the opportunity for promotion to inspector in 2013 because of his race. But the force denies that, noting that two of the eight inspector promotions were given to “racialized minorities.” But how […]

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Published in National
Friday, 03 October 2014 12:38

NCM NewsFeed: Weekly Newsletter Oct. 3

In this edition: How did Hamid Karzai perform as President of one of the most tumultuous countries in the world? + Peel Region leads municipal 'charge' for diversity and inclusion + identity crises faced by migrant professionals… and much more


 

NCM NewsFeed

 

Here and Now

An expert on the Afghan conflict, Farouq Samim, looks back at President Hamid Karzai’s track record over 13 years and comes to this conclusion: On balance, he did a good job.

Peel’s Diversity and Inclusion Charter is the first municipal-level initiative of its kind in Canada and at the forefront of the initiative, Amira Kumar-Ratta, breaks down how equality and inclusion can be reinforced in a community as diverse as the Peel Region.

In many conversations and first-hand witnessing of migrant career journeys in Toronto, Dr. Jelena Zikic of York University, finds that foreign-trained doctors are facing identity crises that migrant professionals experience once they are faced with the inability to be ‘who they are’.

Coming up on NCM: Paul de Silva will take a look at multicultural programming over Canada's airwaves. While our population increases in diversity, our television shows are becoming more and more monochromatic. (Paul de Silva, is a film and TV producer and a doctoral student in the Communications and Culture Program at Ryerson University and Co-director of the International Diaspora Film Festival.)

In diaspora affairs, we will soon be featuring a comment on Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi's first 100 days in office. He's been making waves, including most recently in Washington, but perhaps some of the breathless euphoria is over-the-top. 

In other headlines: 

 

 

Ripples

Canada-EU Trade Deal Good for Canadians?

Just as the Conservative government announced the expensive signing of a trade deal with the European Union, critics were already unraveling the narrative that the deal was good for Canadians. Columnist and author Linda McQuaig referenced a breakdown of numbers prepared by economist Jim Stanford to show a disconnect between government promises and reality. Opposition parties have already decried the deal as giving too much power to foreign corporations who could challenge government decisions that interfere with their profits.  European leaders are looking at removing that controversial aspect of the pact – the investor-state rules- in a similar deal with the United States. The ripples of this deal will no doubt be felt soon enough.

Hajj culminates in Eid Celebrations amid security, health concerns

Millions of Muslims from around the globe, including many from Canada, have descended upon Mecca, Saudi Arabia, for the annual Hajj. The religious event is one of the largest gatherings of its kind in the world. This year, along with the usual security and logistical concerns, officials are closely monitoring pilgrims for any signs of the Ebola virus. Muslims around the world will holdEid festivities, which include sharing food, especially lamb and beef, with friends, neighbours, and the poor.

Harmony Jazz

Thoughtful reflections on citizenship and the Canadian model of multiculturalism and integration by former Governor General Adrienne Clarkson in her Massey Lectures in the Maclean’s interview and excerpt Adrienne Clarkson on the anguish of not belonging.

Pertinent reflections on the crisis in Iraq and Syria and the rise of ISIS and other organizations starting with Dean Obeidallah’s In the Fight Against ISIS, Islam Is Part of the Solution – The Daily Beast, and the history of Islamic extremists by Sheema Khan in  Another battle with Islam’s ‘true believers’ and David Motadel in David Motadel: Why Islamic rebel states always fail. More shallow commentary from Rex Murphy: The case for revoking the citizenship of Canadian terrorists and Margaret Wente: How can we stop the jihadi tourists?

Carleton’s Howard Duncan launches Metropolis Professional Development training in practical rather than academic immigration studies in Canada offers unique training in managing migration | Toronto Star.

A positive initiative to introduce immigrant kids to hockey in Thorncliffe Park neighbourhood in Toronto in Hockey used to ‘Canadianize’ new immigrants and help grow the sport – Toronto | Globalnews.ca.

Back Pocket

The 33rd annual Vancouver International Film Festival welcomes the world's finest films. From September 25 to October 8, almost 365 films from over 70 countries will play on nine screens. Dozens of directors, writers and actors will also be on hand for insightful and occasionally provocative post-screening Q&A sessions. For full film listings and tickets, visit www.viff.org.

Unique in North America, the Festival du Monde Arabe (FMA) in Montreal is dedicated to celebrating and establishing a dialogue between Arab and Western cultures. Through its four components, Performing Arts, Living Culture, Cinema and Media, the festival presents original works in dance, music, theater and multidisciplinary arts. The festival runs from October 24th to November 8th, but free events begin on October 17th.


With that, have a great weekend and don’t forget to look up the next edition of NCM NewsFeed every Friday morning! We will soon be launching an e-mail version of this newsletter, so please subscribe by clicking here.

Publisher’s Note: This NewsFeed was compiled with input from our Newsroom Editors and regular columnist, Andrew Griffith. We welcome your feedback.

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Published in Top Stories
Tuesday, 30 September 2014 09:28

Diversity Charter Takes Root in Peel Region

by Amrita Kumar-Ratta (@i_amrita_)

Peel Region has always been my home. Born in Waterloo, I moved to the City of Brampton with my mother and younger sister when I was seven years old and have collected all of my childhood memories here. A few years later, my father moved to Mississauga and my mother began working in Malton. A couple of years after that, I went to high school in Caledon. Throughout my various experiences in Peel’s three cities - and despite the fact that I am now a Torontonian - I have proudly represented my upbringing as a South Asian Canadian woman from what I consider to be an incredibly diverse Peel Region.

At the same time, I have been shaped immensely by countless instances of – sometimes inadvertent, though always harmful -- discrimination and inequity that I have experienced while growing up here. This includes feeling isolated due to my friendships with people of different ethnicities, being stonewalled in my attempts to challenge instances of institutional racism, and regularly feeling that I would have no future in the performing arts because of my skin colour and my ethnocultural background.

Why do I bring this all up? Well, because a month-and-a-half ago, I became the Project Lead for the second phase of a regional initiative, the Diversity and Inclusion Charter of Peel, developed by the Regional Diversity Roundtable (RDR), to try and correct precisely the kind of experiences I went through growing up.

[...] the Diversity and Inclusion Charter of Peel is the first municipal-level initiative of its kind in Canada.

When the opportunity to participate in the Charter Initiative at RDR, I felt an amazing feeling come over me: This was my opportunity to dynamically contribute to i) enhancing my home region’s existing diversity and prosperity; and to ii) taking concerted action towards social justice in the region by working towards tangible diversity, equity and inclusion with a number of committed individuals and organizations."

Having said all of this, what is it about the Peel Region that fuelled the creation of the Diversity and Inclusion Charter, and what does the Charter entail?

Setting the Stage: Peel Region

The Regional Municipality of Peel is comprised of the City of Brampton, the City of Mississauga and the Town of Caledon. The Region serves 1.3 million residents and approximately 88,000 businesses (2014); it is effectively the second largest municipality in Ontario after Toronto. In fact, the Region has also been hailed as one of the most diverse, fast growing and rapidly changing regions in Canada: 56.8% of its population identifies as visible minority; and it is home to more than 90 languages, the top of which include Punjabi, Urdu, Italian, Tagalog, Tamil and Arabic (2011 Census).

Additionally, in the 2007 Ontario Sustainability Report, Peel Region was ranked sixth overall, among 27 Ontario municipalities, measured on indicators of economic vitality, liveability and smart growth.

 

These statistics all point to the growing vitality of the Peel Region – owing to its diverse demography and its growing economy. However, as I described earlier, there is of course much more to the picture.

For starters, youth unemployment in the region is currently at 20%; nearly 40% of all Peel seniors are living in poverty; and the income gap between Peel males and females 15 years of age and older continues to persist. Additionally, despite the growing number of Aboriginal peoples in Peel (the 2011 Census reported 12,585 individuals with Aboriginal ancestry) (Statistics Canada), the community continues to experience much higher levels of poverty, poor health and substance abuse than Non-Aboriginal residents (Centre for Social Justice). Compounded to all of this is persistent ethnic, racial and religious discrimination. For instance, recent studies have pointed out that newcomers in the Peel Region experience much lower social mobility “comparable to their human capital investment” (Reitz, 2010). While 44% of recent immigrants aged 15 years and older in the Region have a university education, 33% live in poverty. Social exclusion on the basis of ethnicity, race, religion and citizenship status is thus at an all-time high in Peel (Galabuzi and Teelucksingh, 2010). 

Diversity & Inclusion Charter of Peel:  A Game-Changer

 It is this complex context that has given rise to the Diversity and Inclusion Charter of Peel – and it is this context that makes the Charter beneficial to the creation of an equitable, socially just and sustainable region that is unified in its vision for the future.

Social change may be a slow process, but once communities are able to speak out freely against injustice, and once organizations are able to live equity through their practices, it will happen.

Developed by RDR in collaboration with the Peel Newcomer Strategy Group beginning in 2011; and officially launched in Mississauga on April 18, 2013, the Charter is described as a living document that complements – at a grassroots level – national and provincial legislation, including, among others, the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms, the Canadian Multiculturalism Act, the Ontario Human Rights Code, and the Accessibility of Ontarians with Disabilities Act.  Developed in part as a continued reflection of the Racism in Peel Series developed by the United Way of Peel Region in partnership with The Mississauga News and the Brampton Guardian; and in response to cases such as the Anti-Immigrant Flyers that have surfaced twice in 2014, the Charter is, in effect, the Peel’s very own ‘Community Code’. If successfully implemented, it will allow individuals and organizations across the Region – regardless of their stage in the journey towards diversity, equity and inclusion - to take greater advantage of Peel’s diversity and change while conscientiously acting to make sure that everyone feels included and has an equal opportunity to succeed.

While there have been a handful of such Charters spanning the U.K. and Europe (including France, Italy, Sweden, Luxembourg and Austria, among others – see www.diversity-charter.com), the Diversity and Inclusion Charter of Peel is the first municipal-level initiative of its kind in Canada.  As such, it is certainly something that has the potential to inspire, unify and transform other communities Canada-wide, particularly those that are currently experiencing increases in immigration in addition to other demographic, socioeconomic and cultural shifts.  Social change may be a slow process, but once communities are able to speak out freely against injustice, and once organizations are able to live equity through their practices, it will happen. The Diversity and Inclusion Charter of Peel is a small step towards creating a more responsible and self-reflexive society.

For more information and to endorse the Charter, please visit our website or our Facebook Page here


Amrita Kumar-Ratta has a Master’s in Global Affairs from the Munk School at the University of Toronto. She also holds a BA (Hon.) in International Development Studies and World Religions from McGill University. She is passionate about issues of transnational migration, religio-cultural diversity and gender equity. She can be reached at amrita@regionaldiversityroundtable.org

This content was developed exclusively for New Canadian Media and can be re-published with appropriate attribution. For syndication rights, please write to publisher@newcanadianmedia.ca

Published in Top Stories

   ONTARIO’S Peel Regional Police announced Wednesday that on Tuesday “information was miscommunicated to the media” and they wanted to correct that. They said: “The investigation relating to the Immigration Watch flyer distributed last week in Brampton is still ongoing.” Peel Regional Police have sought guidance from the Crown Attorney’s Office regarding the messaging in […]

Indo-Canadian Voice

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Published in National
Sunday, 09 February 2014 10:17

Tamils emerge from the shadows

by Toronto Editor Ranjit Bhaskar
 
If an immigrant community’s coming-of-age needs to be gauged in Canada, the way it is courted by politicians is a good indicator. Leaders of all hues, from the federal to the municipal level, put on an unabashed display last month at the Canadian Tamil Congress (CTC) gala held in the Greater Toronto Area (GTA) city of Markham to celebrate Pongal, the Tamil equivalent of Thanksgiving Day.
 
Those present to woo the 300,000-strong community concentrated mostly in the GTA included Ontario Premier Kathleen Wynne, federal Citizenship and Immigration Minister Chris Alexander, Ontario PC and Official Opposition Leader Tim Hudak, and Markham Mayor Frank Scarpitti.  The pride of place at the event, however, went to Liberal leader Justin Trudeau. Heralded as the “future prime minister,” the gathering gave him a standing ovation. Seemingly carried away by the adulation, Mr Trudeau briefly showed off his Bollywood dance moves and regretted not coming dressed in a traditional South Asian outfit.
 
“Thirty years ago, there were a handful of Tamils in Canada, but today this country is home to tens of thousands of them who have established themselves with their values of hard work and determination,” he said. “These are not Tamil values; these are Canadian values,’’ he said amid rounds of applause.
 
Seeking international investigations into human rights violations by Sri Lanka in the last phases of the ethnic war in 2009, the Liberal leader said Canada would stand by the Tamil community in seeking justice on global platforms, including the UN Human Rights Council session in Geneva next month. This sentiment was echoed by Mr Alexander, who said “Canada will be at the forefront to ensure that accountability comes.”
 
Both the federal politicians were on cue as the session in Geneva is of huge importance to the community. The Canadian Tamil Congress, as part of its advocacy work, will be sending a delegation to Geneva and wants the UN to take decisive action against the Sri Lankan government for violating human rights.
 
Poll calculations
 
While Ms. Wynne said the strides made by the Tamils are “a great Canadian story,” Mr. Alexander said the community has been “a huge success for the Canada’s immigration program.”  That’s a big shift in stance by the Conservative Party, which has been trying hard to undo the harm done by its anti-Tamil rhetoric during the 2011 federal election after two ship loads of asylum seekers from Sri Lanka came ashore on the B.C. coast. Canada’s recent boycott of the Commonwealth summit hosted by Colombo was seen by many as an attempt by the ruling party to curry favour with the Tamils.  
 
Its need to garner support of the community along with that of other immigrant groups in the GTA has grown in importance as the 2015 election nears. The area, dubbed as the “905” after the telephone code that sets it apart from Toronto city, is expected to be a major battleground for votes.  The 905 is believed to have helped the Conservatives form a majority government despite the party doing badly in Québec. Significantly, both the Liberals and the New Democratic Party (NDP) have also stepped up their efforts in the area.
 
A recent opinion poll has suggested that the going will not be easy for the eight Conservative MPs from the area if an election were held right now. The poll, conducted by Mainstreet Technologies and released exclusively to iPolitics, said three could lose their seats and the five others could find themselves in tough battles.
 
“It’s not surprising that given the national popularity of Justin Trudeau and the Liberal Party currently that these numbers are showing this, that there is a Liberal resurgence for sure,” Quito Maggi, president of Mainstreet Technologies, was quoted as saying. “On the other side, it doesn’t show a complete Conservative collapse as well. The Conservative base is alive and well in Peel region [consisting of Brampton and Mississauga].”
 
Tamil Heritage Month
 
At the CTC gala, almost all the leaders competed to promote Tamil culture. Mr. Hudak said he would be reintroducing a bill in the Ontario legislature to declare January as Tamil Heritage Month. Rathika Sitsabaiesan, the NDP MP for Scarborough—Rouge River riding, said she would be pressing ahead with her private bill, C-471, to designate the month as such across Canada. She said this month is celebrated throughout the country by Canadians of Tamil heritage, “as we recognize the cultural, political and economic contributions of Tamil Canadians in our communities.”
 
Ms Sitsabaiesan made no mention of her alleged intimidation by Sri Lankan authorities during her recent visit to the island. Her fellow NDP MP from the Toronto area, Prof. Craig Scott, was honoured with the “Leaders for Change” award at the event for his role as the founding member of the Sri Lanka Campaign for Peace and Justice.
 
 
Apart from this gesture, the Tamil community has been trying hard to reach out to the mainstream. As in the past four years, the CTC once again raised money through its annual walk-a-thon for a Canadian charity. With the cheque for $65,000 presented to the Holland Bloorview Kids Rehabilitation Hospital Foundation, the organization has raised over a quarter-million dollars for five charities in the past five years. Only time will tell whether this is yet another sign of an immigrant group emerging from the shadows to gain the “good immigrants” moniker as suggested by Premier Wynne and Minister Alexander or a cynical attempt to gain political clout.
 

This content was developed exclusively for New Canadian Media and can be re-published with appropriate attribution. For syndication rights, please write to publisher@newcanadianmedia.ca

Published in South Asia
Saturday, 08 February 2014 22:50

Tamils emerge from the shadows

by Toronto Editor Ranjit Bhaskar
 
If an immigrant community’s coming-of-age needs to be gauged in Canada, the way it is courted by politicians is a good indicator. Leaders of all hues, from the federal to the municipal level, put on an unabashed display last month at the Canadian Tamil Congress (CTC) gala held in the Greater Toronto Area (GTA) city of Markham to celebrate Pongal, the Tamil equivalent of Thanksgiving Day.
 
Those present to woo the 300,000-strong community concentrated mostly in the GTA included Ontario Premier Kathleen Wynne, federal Citizenship and Immigration Minister Chris Alexander, Ontario PC and Official Opposition Leader Tim Hudak, and Markham Mayor Frank Scarpitti.  The pride of place at the event, however, went to Liberal leader Justin Trudeau. Heralded as the “future prime minister,” the gathering gave him a standing ovation. Seemingly carried away by the adulation, Mr Trudeau briefly showed off his Bollywood dance moves and regretted not coming dressed in a traditional South Asian outfit.
 
“Thirty years ago, there were a handful of Tamils in Canada, but today this country is home to tens of thousands of them who have established themselves with their values of hard work and determination,” he said. “These are not Tamil values; these are Canadian values,’’ he said amid rounds of applause.
 
Seeking international investigations into human rights violations by Sri Lanka in the last phases of the ethnic war in 2009, the Liberal leader said Canada would stand by the Tamil community in seeking justice on global platforms, including the UN Human Rights Council session in Geneva next month. This sentiment was echoed by Mr Alexander, who said “Canada will be at the forefront to ensure that accountability comes.”
 
Both the federal politicians were on cue as the session in Geneva is of huge importance to the community. The Canadian Tamil Congress, as part of its advocacy work, will be sending a delegation to Geneva and wants the UN to take decisive action against the Sri Lankan government for violating human rights.
 
Poll calculations
 
While Ms. Wynne said the strides made by the Tamils are “a great Canadian story,” Mr. Alexander said the community has been “a huge success for the Canada’s immigration program.”  That’s a big shift in stance by the Conservative Party, which has been trying hard to undo the harm done by its anti-Tamil rhetoric during the 2011 federal election after two ship loads of asylum seekers from Sri Lanka came ashore on the B.C. coast. Canada’s recent boycott of the Commonwealth summit hosted by Colombo was seen by many as an attempt by the ruling party to curry favour with the Tamils.  
 
Its need to garner support of the community along with that of other immigrant groups in the GTA has grown in importance as the 2015 election nears. The area, dubbed as the “905” after the telephone code that sets it apart from Toronto city, is expected to be a major battleground for votes.  The 905 is believed to have helped the Conservatives form a majority government despite the party doing badly in Québec. Significantly, both the Liberals and the New Democratic Party (NDP) have also stepped up their efforts in the area.
 
A recent opinion poll has suggested that the going will not be easy for the eight Conservative MPs from the area if an election were held right now. The poll, conducted by Mainstreet Technologies and released exclusively to iPolitics, said three could lose their seats and the five others could find themselves in tough battles.
 
“It’s not surprising that given the national popularity of Justin Trudeau and the Liberal Party currently that these numbers are showing this, that there is a Liberal resurgence for sure,” Quito Maggi, president of Mainstreet Technologies, was quoted as saying. “On the other side, it doesn’t show a complete Conservative collapse as well. The Conservative base is alive and well in Peel region [consisting of Brampton and Mississauga].”
 
Tamil Heritage Month
 
At the CTC gala, almost all the leaders competed to promote Tamil culture. Mr. Hudak said he would be reintroducing a bill in the Ontario legislature to declare January as Tamil Heritage Month. Rathika Sitsabaiesan, the NDP MP for Scarborough—Rouge River riding, said she would be pressing ahead with her private bill, C-471, to designate the month as such across Canada. She said this month is celebrated throughout the country by Canadians of Tamil heritage, “as we recognize the cultural, political and economic contributions of Tamil Canadians in our communities.”
 
Ms Sitsabaiesan made no mention of her alleged intimidation by Sri Lankan authorities during her recent visit to the island. Her fellow NDP MP from the Toronto area, Prof. Craig Scott, was honoured with the “Leaders for Change” award at the event for his role as the founding member of the Sri Lanka Campaign for Peace and Justice.
 
 
Apart from this gesture, the Tamil community has been trying hard to reach out to the mainstream. As in the past four years, the CTC once again raised money through its annual walk-a-thon for a Canadian charity. With the cheque for $65,000 presented to the Holland Bloorview Kids Rehabilitation Hospital Foundation, the organization has raised over a quarter-million dollars for five charities in the past five years. Only time will tell whether this is yet another sign of an immigrant group emerging from the shadows to gain the “good immigrants” moniker as suggested by Premier Wynne and Minister Alexander or a cynical attempt to gain political clout.
 

This content was developed exclusively for New Canadian Media and can be re-published with appropriate attribution. For syndication rights, please write to publisher@newcanadianmedia.ca

Published in Top Stories

 
  Peel - Investigators from the Peel Regional Police Fraud Bureau would like to advise the public about an ongoing scam involving fraudulent communications from the CRA.

Published in Economy

   A Peel police officer has filed a complaint with the Human Rights Tribunal of Ontario, alleging that he was discriminated and passed over for a promotion. Det. Sgt. Baljiwan Singh Sandhu, of Mississauga, filed the complaint on Jan. 21, which outlines his allegations against the police force. According to his complaint, Sandhu, who’s originally […]

The Weekly Voice

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Published in National
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Poll Question

Do you agree with the new immigration levels for 2017?

Yes - 30.8%
No - 46.2%
Don't know - 23.1%
The voting for this poll has ended on: %05 %b %2016 - %21:%Dec

Featured Quote

The honest truth is there is still reluctance around immigration policy... When we want to talk about immigration and we say we want to bring more immigrants in because it's good for the economy, we still get pushback.

-- Canada's economic development minister Navdeep Bains at a Public Policy Forum economic summit

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